Life Is Like Riding A Bicycle: To Keep Your Balance You Must Keep Moving…

Featured Image: Sao Paolo Street Artist Eduardo Kobra’s Illuminating mural of Einstein Keeping his balance

Like street artist Eduardo Kobra’s fantastic image of Einstein on his bike (chasing a beam of light) promoting his dynamic search for relativity, we’re all seeking a way of connecting our lives with the environment in a meaningful and creative way.

In the last couple of years we realise that we want a way of life that we feel is helping everyone: no waste of people, resources or the precious environment.

We know that we instinctively love the John Lewis model of retailing: choice, quality, service, accessories, repair but we know how even John Lewis have been overwhelmed by a warehouse culture that distorts supply chains and their relationship with their customers.

New ways of doing things should be a normal part of everyone’s hope for Nottingham whatever your age, background, ethnicity, or disability (we all know that we need a healthy environment, that cars need to become electric and that as householders we’d like more control over our energy consumption, the quality of education, training, lifelong skills).

Economic regeneration is really about how we value, revalue and distribute the resources, knowledge we have on every doorstep so that everyone can connect it to the way they want to do things, make things, contribute. Everyone has a vision, not just the supposed visionaries. Micro and small businesses and their reasons for being are the energy that crosses time, space and the generations: let’s support them in a way that enables them to bring up and educate their children, care for their families and participate in public spaces so that they’re supported.

This is about urban rural divides as well as divides inside cities, towns and rural spaces.

In the last couple of years we realise that we want a way of life that we feel is helping everyone: no waste of people, resources or the precious environment. We instinctively love the John Lewis model of retailing: choice, quality, service, accessories, warranty and repair but we know how even John Lewis have been overwhelmed by a warehouse culture that distorts supply chains and their relationship with their customers.

A refreshed and dynamic retail scene will come from revaluing what’s on our doorstep and understanding how much we improve ourselves through making new relationships with more people, more of the time.

At the heart of a good economy are the twin drivers of evolution and revolution. What we forget is the history, labour and sacrifice that made the products and the process that we assume is ours. Let’s remember when we’re able to afford the latest model of anything all the people in the millions of supply chains across time, space and geographies who’ve given us the edge and let’s be a little more humble.