When you think about the way you live your life, the way you go out of your way to help people: it’s because you care, because you want things to be better for others.

What happens to you throughout your life can be random: acts of cruelty or kindness and the way you respond makes a massive difference to the outcome. Trevor Clower organises Carer’s Roadshows across Nottingham. More details on the number above.

Trevor Clower

Above Trevor Clower in last year’s Evening Post publicity article August 2016

Like Stephanie Palmer who ran a fantastic care business until she had a stroke and had to reassess everything (now Stephanie runs Wellbeing and You,  giving carers access to resources: training and podcasts), Trevor is committed to improving things for everyone.

Trev clower

Trevor Clower’s son Scott works, though he has autism and a learning disability.

In the latest of a series of blogs on the NHS Learning Disability Employment Programme, dad Trevor Clower reflects on the positive impact it’s had on the life of his son, Scott:

At 37-years-old, our son had a fairly standard routine.

Scott has a learning disability and autism and five days-a week he attends a day centre. On Wednesdays he enjoys an evening social, while once a month spends time with his befriender.

But as Scott’s parents, we could see he had the potential and desire to gain employment and would benefit from the confidence, independence and skills development that a job that was the right fit would give him.

Scott always expressed a particular interest in doing a manual job, so he could use his hands and skills in a practical way and earn his own money. With the support of Nottingham City Council and their pathway to work programme, we identified a suitable job our son in one of the council parks garage depots. This was a job that appealed to Scott’s interests and desire to enter a practical role.

As parents, although we were nervous, we felt reassured that Scott would be supported during his employment time. The hours Scott spent at work were gradually expanded as his confidence and skills developed.

As soon as Scott started, he told us he enjoyed the job immensely. In contrast to his previous routine, one of the best things about the job has been the chance for him to get to talk to lots of different people during his working day. Scott liked telling us about his working day, and was always particularly keen to know what sandwiches his Mum had packed for him to take to work.

Working in the garage has made a huge difference to his enthusiasm – he has taken pride in telling us how he helped to empty oil out of vehicle engines, as well as going out on test drives after the repair. Scott got on well with his colleagues in the garage as well as the person from the Council assigned to advocate for him.

We have certainly seen how our son has grown into a worldlier person while in work and the positive impact it has had on him.

There’s nothing to lose and everything to gain in popping along to visit the stallholders to see what support services are available to carers.

Its all free.  There are 100 stalls booked so far at 18 venues.

 

If you want to publicise it there are  printed copies of flyers and a poster which businesses and organisations can distribute or put up in public spaces both in A5 and A4.please email carersroadshow@outlook.com  providing their address and we can post some out.

 

 

 

 

 

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